Ben Quayle’s Ad, Worst President Ever Comments

August 12, 2010

Ben Quayle, the son of former Vice President Dan Quayle is running for Congress in Arizona. He recently released an advertisement calling President Obama the “worst president in history.” You can watch the ad here . This ad is the perfect example as to why I get so frustrated with Washington D.C. politics.

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Visualizing $1 Trillion

August 5, 2010

Our national debt for the first 9 months of our fiscal year was over $1 trillion for the first time. It was the quickest time that our countries has reached a $1 trillion deficit. Here is the main article from Yahoo News, that points out what $1,000,000,000,000 buys.

Here are the highlights, as food for thought as we wind down the fiscal year (that ends September 30th). Read the rest of this entry »


Thoughts on The Intelligence Leaks Via WikiLeaks

July 29, 2010

This week, there has been a media firestorm regarding the 90,000 documents that were previously marked “Classified.” They were leaked via the Internet and WikiLeaks.

Like many things, my thoughts are mixed on this. I totally understand and agree with national security. I read what I thought was a New York Times article about three weeks ago that said there were over 850,000 people in the United States with Top Secret Security Clearances. That’s nearly one in every 300 Americans. That’s a lot of people.

Our security should be one of our top priorities, but I would be interested in learning of a new approach of streamlining to know who has what types of security clearances. This would be a facinating report, and I hope that it’s already done and in the hands of the top Administration Officials.

I would like to hope though, in any leak of this kind, that there are serious considerations for the safety of those that could be in harms way if information is released. However, I think that as a country and nation, when things are declassified in a timely manner as they should (if it’s deemed safe) that we can learn from possible mistakes or missteps. I think this is an important piece of American history and the uniqueness of our political system.

I haven’t looked through, and honestly have no desire to go through the leaked documents. However, I hope that they were released with good intentions. Unfortunately though, why our security is so vulnerable is because of the amount of knowledge that one person possibly possesses, and if they wanted to use that information for harm, it could be done. Time, and the news media will tell us how “explosive” these documents are, and I hope the government is honest if they tell us that this leak has the potential to harm Americans at home and abroad.

That’s my two cents. What say you?


Shirley Sherrod & America’s Bad On Calling Her Racist

July 22, 2010

I’m going to be moving on thin ice with this post. However, I feel that I must comment on the forced resignation and then reneging and apologizing to Shirley Sherrod.

She was an official in the Department of Agriculture. She spoke at a NAACP convention and a clip of her speech was released late last week. She was later forced to resign based on her statements, where she recalled a scenario where she didn’t want to help out a poor farmer because he was white. What isn’t shown is her followup statements where she said that she helped him and she realized there were essentially two types of people: those who were needy and those who weren’t.

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Reeling in Independent Voters to Take Back Congress

July 15, 2010

Two polls out this week have shown Americans are losing faith in the Obama administration. On Tuesday, the ABC News/Washington Post poll showed that nearly 60% of Americans “lack faith” in President Obama. 58% of respondents said they had “just some” or “none” confidence in Obama to make the right decision for America’s future.

Time Magazine just published their latest poll, showing that 49% of respondents approve of Obama’s performance while 45% disapprove. 56% of respondents said that the U.S. is on the wrong track. Read the rest of this entry »


Special Thoughts on Special Session

July 14, 2010

Everyone that knows me knows that I have a special place in my heart for Missouri politics. For us political junkies, there has been lots of excitement. At the end of June, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon called a special session to do two things. 1) Pass tax incentives to keep the Ford plant in Claycomo, Missouri and 2) reform Missouri’s state pension plan for future state employees. A 20+ hour filibuster against the $150 million tax credit proposal ended this morning in the Missouri Senate.

I’m not a fan of corporate tax incentives. Ford has (not publicly, but to politicians) threatened to leave Missouri if they do not receive tax incentives to keep the plan open. How much will this cost Missourians? $150,000,000 over 10 years, or $15,000,000 per year. In other words, Missouri taxpayers will be subsidizing the salaries of these workers, if they stay) to the tune of $4,054 per employee, per year. Multiply that times the 10 year period and Missouri taxpayers are nearly paying the salaries of these 3,700 employees, paying the equivalent of $40,540 per employee.

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The Need To Extend Portions of Bush’s Tax Cuts

July 8, 2010

President George W. Bush’s tax cuts are set to expire on December 31st. While Democrats labeled these temporary tax cuts as “only for the rich,” these expiring cuts will drastically impact the middle and lower classes in America. The U.S. Congress should pass an extension of these tax cuts at least for those in the tax brackets below $100,000. The reality of the situation is that 85% of Americans earn less than $100,000 per year, and only 5.5% of Americans earn more than $150,000.

I have put together a chart of the current tax rates to compare them with what they were before the Bush tax cuts, and it’s below. As a college student, my tax rate is at the current 15% rate, and would increase over 60% to 25% if these tax cuts are allowed to sunset.  

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